Difference between revisions of "User:Garmmon/List of Mythological References in Digimon"

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(Greek Mythology)
(Greek Mythology)
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<br>'''[[Apollomon]]''' - {{w|Apollo}} was the god the of the sun and also the twin brother of Diana/Artemis in Roman and Greek mythology.
 
<br>'''[[Apollomon]]''' - {{w|Apollo}} was the god the of the sun and also the twin brother of Diana/Artemis in Roman and Greek mythology.
 
* Phoebus Blow - 'Phoebus' was one of the ephitets applied to Apollo, which literally meant 'radiant'.
 
* Phoebus Blow - 'Phoebus' was one of the ephitets applied to Apollo, which literally meant 'radiant'.
'''[[Archnemon]]''' - {{w|Arachne}} was a great mortal weaver who boasted that her skill was greater than that of Athena, goddess of wisdom and strategy, refusing to acknowledge that her knowledge came, in part at least, from the goddess. Offended by Arachne's arrogance, Athena set a contest between the two weavers. Ultimately, the goddess turned Arachne into a spider.
+
'''[[Archnemon]]''' - {{w|Arachne}} was a great mortal weaver who boasted that her skill was greater than that of Athena, goddess of wisdom and strategy, refusing to acknowledge that her knowledge came, in part at least, from the goddess. Offended by Arachne's arrogance, Athena set a contest between the two weavers. Ultimately, the goddess turned Arachne into a spider. For this reason, she bore the title of "Queen of Spiders".
 
<br>'''[[Arkadimon]]''' - {{w|Arcadia}} was a region in Greece that was celebrated as a utopia, an unspoiled, harmonious wilderness, in Greek mythology.
 
<br>'''[[Arkadimon]]''' - {{w|Arcadia}} was a region in Greece that was celebrated as a utopia, an unspoiled, harmonious wilderness, in Greek mythology.
 
<br>'''[[Beautymon]]'''  
 
<br>'''[[Beautymon]]'''  

Revision as of 09:55, 13 September 2017

Personal reference, still incomplete. Some c&p from the main Digimon pages and from Wikipedia. I don't know if such a list exists yet?

American Mythology

Coatlmon - From Quetzalcoatl, one of the manifestations of the sun god Tezcatlipoca and represented as a plumed serpent in Mesoamerican mythology.
Culumon - 'Culu' is a corruption of kuru, from Kābankuru, the romanisation of Carbuncle, a mythical creature that was allegedly sighted in Latin America which was said to have a shining jewel on its forehead.
El Doradimon - From El Dorado, the name of the legendary South American city that was fabled for its great wealth of gold and precious jewels and eagerly sought by 16th- and 17th-century explorers.
Thunderbirmon - From the Thunderbird, a supernatural bird of power and strength found in the legends of some Native American tribes.
Wendimon - From the Wendigo, a mythical cannibalistic monster that roams the forest hunting for humans to devour according to Native American mythology.

Balinese Mythology

Baromon - From Barong, the king of the spirits, leader of the hosts of good, and enemy of Rangda, the demon queen and mother of all spirit guarders, in the mythological traditions of Bali.

Chinese Mythology

Baihumon - From the Baihu, or White Tiger of the West, one of the four mythological creatures in the Chinese constellations. It represents the west and the autumn season, and its element is metal.
Cho·Hakkaimon - From Cho Hakkai, the Japanese reading of Zhu Bajie, one of the three helpers of Xuanzang in the classic Chinese novel Journey to the West. He looks like a terrible monster, part human and part pig, who often gets himself and his companions into trouble through his laziness, gluttony, and propensity for lusting after pretty women.
Ginkakumon - From Yinjiao, a character from Journey to the West who was the brother of Jinjiao.
Gokuwmon - From Son Gokuu, the Japanese reading of Sun Wukong, also known as the Monkey King, who is a main character in the classical Chinese epic novel Journey to the West. In the novel, he is a monkey born from a stone who acquires supernatural powers through Taoist practices. After rebelling against heaven and being imprisoned under a mountain by the Buddha, he later accompanies the monk Xuanzang on a journey to retrieve Buddhist sutras from India.
Gumdramon

  • Kinkoji - From the Kinkoji, the Japanese reading of the Jinguzhou, a curse which, when read by Tang Sanzhang, will cause Sun Wukong's headband to tighten and cause him to have a horrible headache so that he can be controlled more easily.

Hououmon - From the Houou, the Japanese pronunciation of the Fenghuang, a mythological bird of East Asia that reigns over all other birds. In the West, it is commonly referred to as the Chinese phoenix or simply Phoenix.
Huanglongmon - From the Huanglong, a hornless dragon which once emerged from the River Luo and presented the legendary Emperor Fu Xi with the elements of writing. Its waking, sleeping and breathing determined day and night, season and weather. It is the guardian of the center and it represents the element earth, the Chinese quintessence, as well as the changing of the seasons.
Kinkakumon - From Jinjiao, a character from Journey to the West who was the brother of Yinjiao.
Ouryumon - From Ōryū, the zoomorphic incarnation of the Yellow Deity of the centre of the universe in Chinese religion and mythology.
Sagomon - From Sa Gojou, the Japanese translation of the name Sha Wujing, a character from Journey to the West.

  • Kouyouhouzhou - Named after the Jiangyao Baozhang, the name of Sha Wujing's weapon in Journey to the West.

Sanzomon - From Sanzou, the Japanese reading of Tang Sanzhang, a character from Journey to the West. He is a Chinese Buddhist monk who had renounced his family to join the Sangha from childhood. He is actually a reincarnation of Golden Cicada, a disciple of the Buddha. Sun Wukong, Zhu Bajie and Sha Wujing become his disciples who aid and protect him on his journey. He is constantly terrorised by monsters and demons because of a legend which says that one can attain immortality by consuming his flesh because he is a reincarnation of a holy being.

  • Toshishun-kyou - Named after the legend of Du Zichun, a famous piece among the Tang Dynasty legends.
  • Kochoumu-kyou - Named after the butterfly dream, which originated from a section of Zhuangzi's book, named after him. It goes 'Once Zhuangzi dreamt he was a butterfly, a butterfly flitting and fluttering around, happy with himself and doing as he pleased. He didn't know he was Zhuangzi. Suddenly he woke up and there he was, solid and unmistakable Zhuangzi. But he didn't know if he was Zhuangzi who had dreamt he was a butterfly, or a butterfly dreaming he was Zhuangzi. Between Zhuangzi and a butterfly there must be some distinction! This is called the Transformation of Things.'

Shawujinmon - From Sha Wujing, one of the three disciples of Xuanzang in Journey to the West. He was originally a general in Heaven before being exiled to earth as punishment, where he was to be reincarnated as a terrible man-eating sand demon. He had a red beard and his head was partially bald, a necklace consisting of skulls, and still carried the weapon he had in Heaven, a yueyachan (crescent-shovel), a double-headed staff with a crescent-moon blade at one end and a spade at the other, with six xizhang rings in the shovel part to denote its religious association.

  • Kouyouzhou - Named after the Jiangyao Baozhang, the name of Sha Wujing's weapon in Journey to the West.

Tyilinmon - From the Qilin, a mythical hooved Chinese chimerical creature known throughout various East Asian cultures, and is said to appear with the imminent arrival or passing of a wise sage or an illustrious ruler.
Qinglongmon - From the Qinglong, or Azure Dragon of the East, one of the four mythological creatures in the Chinese constellations. It represents the east and the spring season, and its element is wood. It is also referred to in media, feng shui, other cultures, and in various venues as the Green Dragon and the Avalon Dragon.
Xuanwumon - From the Xuanwu, or Black Warrior of the North, one of the four mythological creatures in the Chinese constellations. It represents the north and the winter season, and its element is water. Often translated as Black Tortoise in English, it is usually depicted as both a tortoise and a snake, specifically with the snake coiling around the tortoise.
Zhuqiaomon - From the Zhuque, or Vermilion bird of the South, one of the four mythological creatures in the Chinese constellations. It represents the west and the summer season, and its element is fire.

Christian/Catholic mythology

Armagemon - From Armageddon, the site of a gathering of armies for a battle during the end times prophesied in the Bible.
Bagramon - From a demonic inversion of Gabrael, the "Angel of Revelation" in the Abrahamic religions, who was often entrusted to deliver several important messages on God’s behalf.
Cherubimon - From the cherub/cherubim, the second highest rank in the angelic hierarchy, following the Seraphim. Cherubim first appear in the Bible in the Garden of Eden, to guard the way to the Tree of life.
Eater Adam - Adam was the first human, mentioned in the Book of Genesis.
Eater Eve - Eve was the first woman and the wife of Adam, mentioned in the Book of Genesis.
Jesmon - Jesus is the central figure of Christianity, the son of God who is most commonly regarded as the Messiah.
Lilithmon

  • Sheol - Sheol is the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible's underworld, a place of darkness to which all the dead go, both the righteous and the unrighteous, regardless of the moral choices made in life, a place of stillness and darkness cut off from God.

Megidramon - From Megiddo, the hill where the final battle between good and evil, Armageddon, will take place, as outlined in the Book of Revelation.
Ofanimon - From the ophanim/ofanim, a class of celestial beings in late sections of the Book of Enoch where with the Cherubim and Seraphim they never sleep, but guard the throne of God. THe are also depicted as eye-covered wheels (each composed of two nested wheels), that move next to the winged Cherubim, beneath the throne of God.
Seraphimon - From the seraph/seraphim, the highest rank of angels in the Christian angelic hierarchy. They are the caretakers of God's throne, continuously singing "holy, holy, holy".
Sistermon Noir

  • Anthony - Anthony the Great was a Christian saint from Egypt, a prominent leader among the Desert Fathers. Anthony was the first known ascetic going into the wilderness, a geographical move that seems to have contributed to his renown. Accounts of Anthony enduring supernatural temptation during his sojourn in the Libyan Desert inspired the often-repeated subject of the temptation of St. Anthony in Western art and literature.

Demonology

Astamon - From Astaroth, a Crowned Prince of Hell and a demon of the First Hierarchy, who seduces by means of laziness, vanity, and rationalized philosophies.
Baalmon - From Baal, a demon who is said to be either one of the seven princes of Hell or the first King of Hell depending on the source. He commands 66 legions of demons.

  • Red Book of Appin - The Red Book of Appin is a grimoire/treatise on black magic and demonology taken from the collection of an English merchant, Joseph Appin.

Barbamon - From Barbatos, an Earl and Duke of Hell who rules thirty legions of demons and has four kings as his companions to command his legions. He gives the understanding of the voices of the animals, says past and future, conciliates friends and rulers, and he can lead men to hidden treasures that have been hidden by the enchantment of magicians.
Beelzebumon - From Beelzebub, a demon sometimes depicted as one of the Seven Princes of Hell, and sometimes as the Devil. His name means 'Lord of the Flies', and he is sometimes depicted as a fly.

  • Behemoth - A powerful beast mentioned in the Bible whose actual identity changes with various depictions. It was created by God, and can only be stopped/controlled by God.

Belial Vamdemon - From Belial, the name given to Satan's form that is arisen upon the Earth during Armageddon.

  • Sodom and Gomorrah - Sodom and Gomorrah were cities mentioned in the Book of Genesis and throughout the Hebrew Bible, the New Testament and Deuterocanonical sources, as well as the Qur'an. Divine judgment by Yahweh was then passed upon Sodom and Gomorrah along with two other neighboring cities that were completely consumed by fire and brimstone. In Abrahamic traditions, Sodom and Gomorrah have become synonymous with impenitent sin, and their fall with a proverbial manifestation of God's wrath. Sodom and Gomorrah have been used as metaphors for vice and homosexuality viewed as a deviation.

Belphemon - From the demon Belphegor, one of the seven Princes of Hell, who helps people make discoveries. He seduces people by suggesting to them ingenious inventions that will make them rich.
Demon - From the Cacodemon, an evil supernatural being who posseses an extraordinary shape-shifting hability, and for that reason is never known by which guise it could appear to mortal men. The modern notion of "demon" comes from this ancient concept.
Leviamon - From the Leviathan, a sea monster referred to in the Bible. The word has become synonymous with any large sea monster or creature. In Demonology, the Leviathan is one of the seven princes of Hell and its gatekeeper.
Leviathan - From the Leviathan, a sea monster referred to in the Bible. The word has become synonymous with any large sea monster or creature. In Demonology, the Leviathan is one of the seven princes of Hell and its gatekeeper.
Lucemon - From Lucifer, a royal title that is commonly considered Satan's name before his rebellion.
Lucemon: Satan Mode - From Satan, the personification of evil and temptation, and is known as the deceiver that leads humanity astray. The term is often applied to an angel who fell out of favor with God, seducing humanity into the ways of sin, and who now rules over the fallen world.
Mephismon - From Mephistopheles, a devil in the form of a greyfriar summoned by Faust in a wood outside Wittenberg. He comes to serve and ultimately collect the souls of those who are already damned.
Murmukusmon - From Murmur/Murmux, a Great Duke and Earl of Hell who has thirty legions of demons under his command. He teaches Philosophy, and can oblige the souls of the deceased to appear before the conjurer to answer every desired question. Murmur is depicted as a soldier riding a Vulture or a Griffin, and wearing a ducal crown.

  • Gehenna Flame - Gehenna was believed to be a location where children were sacrificed to Moloch and was deemed to be cursed. In Jewish, Christian and Islamic scripture, Gehenna is a destination of the wicked.

Phelesmon - From Mephistopheles, a devil in the form of a greyfriar summoned by Faust in a wood outside Wittenberg. He comes to serve and ultimately collect the souls of those who are already damned.
Warudamon

  • Satan Mund - Satan is the personification of evil and temptation, and is known as the deceiver that leads humanity astray. The term is often applied to an angel who fell out of favor with God, seducing humanity into the ways of sin, and who now rules over the fallen world.

Egyptian Mythology

Ancient Sphinxmon - From the Sphinx, a mythical creature with, as a minimum, the body of a lion and the head of a human. It is a benevolent being in Egyptian mythology.
Anubimon - From Anubis, a jackal-headed god associated with mummification and the afterlife in ancient Egypt.

  • Ammit - a female demon in ancient Egyptian religion with a body that was part lion, hippopotamus and crocodile. After death, the person's heart would be weighed by Anubis; if it was heavier than a feather and thus 'impure', it would be devoured by Ammit.

Bastemon - From Bastet, a feline goddess of fire, cats, of the home and pregnant women in ancient Egypt. She is sometimes depicted as a docile protector of the home, and other times as an aggressive and vicious warrior.
Goddramon

  • Amon/Umon - From Amon/Amun, whose name origin means "hidden", one of the eight ancient Egyptian gods who formed the Ogdoad of Hermopolis. He was the god of the air and his consort was Amunet.

Holsmon - From Horus, often the ancient Egyptians' national patron god. He was usually depicted as a falcon-headed man wearing the pschent, or a red and white crown, as a symbol of kingship over the entire kingdom of Egypt. Horus served many functions in the Egyptian pantheon, most notably being the god of the sun, war and protection.
Nefertimon - From Nefertiti, a queen of ancient Egypt who was the Great Royal Wife (chief consort) of the Egyptian Pharaoh Akhenaten. Nefertiti and her husband were known for a religious revolution, in which they worshiped one god only, Aten, or the sun disc.

  • Rosetta Stone - The Rosetta Stone is an ancient Egyptian granodiorite stele inscribed with a decree issued at Memphis in 196 BC on behalf of King Ptolemy V. The decree appears in three scripts: the upper text is Ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs, the middle portion Demotic script, and the lowest Ancient Greek. Because it presents essentially the same text in all three scripts, it provided the key to the modern understanding of Egyptian hieroglyphs.


Sethmon - From Set, a god of the desert, storms, and foreigners in ancient Egyptian religion. In later myths he is also the god of darkness and chaos. In Egyptian mythology, Set is portrayed as the usurper that killed and mutilated his own brother Osiris. Osiris' son Horus sought revenge upon Set, and the myths describe their conflicts.

English Mythology

Beowulfmon - From Beowulf, a legendary Geatish hero and later turned king in the epic poem named after him.
Cockatrimon - From the Cockatrice, a mythical beast often depicted as a two-legged dragon or serpent with a rooster's head. It is able to turn people to stone or kill them by looking at them in the eye.
Craniummon

  • Avalon - Avalon is a legendary island featured in the Arthurian legend. It was the place where King Arthur's sword Excalibur was forged and later where Arthur was taken to recover from his wounds after the Battle of Camlann.

Dorbickmon

  • Tyrant Collbrande - Collbrande is an alternate name for King Arthur's sword, the Caliburn/Excalibur.

Dukemon: Crimson Mode

  • Blutgang - Blutgang is the name of the sword belonging to Háma, a legendary Germanic hero who appears in the Anglo-Saxon poems Beowulf and Widsith, in the Scandinavian Þiðrekssaga and in German epics such as Alpharts Tod.

Examon

  • Caledfwlch - The Welsh name for the Excalibur, it is the legendary sword of King Arthur sometimes attributed with magical powers. In Welsh legend, the Caledfwlch is one of Arthur's most valuable possessions and is used by Arthur's warrior Llenlleawg the Irishman to kill the Irish king Diwrnach while stealing his magical cauldron.
  • Ambrosius - Ambrosius Aurelianus was a war leader of the Romano-British who won an important battle against the Anglo-Saxons in the 5th century.
  • Avalon's Gate - Avalon is a legendary island featured in the Arthurian legend. It was the place where King Arthur's sword Excalibur was forged and later where Arthur was taken to recover from his wounds after the Battle of Camlann.
  • Pendragon's Glory - Pendragon, meaning in Welsh "head dragon" or "chief dragon" (a figurative title referring to status as a leader), is the name of several traditional Kings of the Britons, including Ambrosius Aurelianus, son of Constantine II of Britain, who was called "Pendragon" in the Vulgate Cycle, as well as King Arthur.

Holy Angemon

  • Excalibur - Excalibur is the legendary sword of King Arthur, sometimes attributed with magical powers or associated with the rightful sovereignty of Great Britain. When Excalibur was first drawn, in the first battle testing Arthur's sovereignty, its blade blinded his enemies.

French Mythology

Duramon/Durandamon - From the Durendal/Durandal, the legendary sword of the French hero Roland from The Song of Roland.
Orgemon - From the Orge, a legendary monster usually depicted as a large, hideous, manlike being that eats ordinary human beings, especially infants and children.

Greek Mythology

Aegiomon - From Aegipan or Goat-Pan, the son of Zeus and Aega.
Aegiochusmon - From Jove Aegiochus, the epithet Zeus received as the father of Aegipan.
Algomon - From Argus Panoptes, or Argos, who was a primordial giant whose epithet, "Panoptes", "all-seeing", led to his being described with multiple, often one hundred, eyes.
Ancient Irismon - From Iris, the personification of the rainbow and messenger of the gods in Greek mythology. She is also known as one of the goddesses of the sea and the sky, and travels with the speed of wind from one end of the world to the other.
Ancient Mermaimon - From the Mermaid, a legendary aquatic creature with the head and upper body of a female human and the tail of a fish.
Ancient Sphinxmon - From the Sphinx, a mythical creature with, as a minimum, the body of a lion and the head of a human. In Greek mythology, it would kill and eat those who could not answer its riddle.
Ancient Troiamon - From Troia, a legendary city and center of the Trojan War. It is also a reference to the Trojan Horse.

  • Epeius - Epeius, son of Panopeus, was a Greek soldier during the Trojan War. He built the Trojan Horse, commissioned by Odysseus because Athena had told him in a dream she would be with him to help build it.

Apocalymon - From Apocalypse, the revelation of the end of the world. In religious contexts it is usually a disclosure of something hidden, 'a vision of heavenly secrets that can make sense of earthly realities'.
Apollomon - Apollo was the god the of the sun and also the twin brother of Diana/Artemis in Roman and Greek mythology.

  • Phoebus Blow - 'Phoebus' was one of the ephitets applied to Apollo, which literally meant 'radiant'.

Archnemon - Arachne was a great mortal weaver who boasted that her skill was greater than that of Athena, goddess of wisdom and strategy, refusing to acknowledge that her knowledge came, in part at least, from the goddess. Offended by Arachne's arrogance, Athena set a contest between the two weavers. Ultimately, the goddess turned Arachne into a spider. For this reason, she bore the title of "Queen of Spiders".
Arkadimon - Arcadia was a region in Greece that was celebrated as a utopia, an unspoiled, harmonious wilderness, in Greek mythology.
Beautymon

  • Rosa Phoenix - In Greek Mythology, a Phoenix is a mythical bird of great beauty fabled to live 1,400 years, to burn itself on a funeral pyre, and to rise from its ashes in the freshness of youth and live through another cycle of years; often an emblem of immortality or of reborn idealism or hope.

Black War Greymon X-Antibody

  • Hades Force - Hades was the ancient Greek god of the underworld, and the name was eventually also used to designate the abode of the dead.

Callismon - From Callisto, a nymph of Artemis. Transformed into a bear and set among the stars, she was the bear-mother of the Arcadians, through her son Arcas.
Centalmon - From centaur, a half-man and half-horse creature from Greek mythology.
Cerberumon - From Cerberus, a three-headed dog who guarded the gates of Hades in Greek mythology, to prevent those who have crossed the river Styx from ever escaping.

  • Styx Killer - The Styx is a river in Greek mythology that formed the boundary between Earth and the Underworld.

Cerberumon: Jinrou Mode - From Jinrou, Japanese word which means werewolf, a mythological or folkloric human with the ability to shapeshift into a wolf.
Chaos Dukemon

  • Judecca Prison - Judecca is one of the four sections of Cocytus, a river in the underworld in Greek mythology.
  • Gorgon - The term 'Gorgon' commonly refers to any of three sisters who had hair of living, venomous snakes, and a horrifying visage that turned those who beheld her to stone.

Chimairamon - From the Chimera, a creature composed of the parts of three animals: a lion, a serpent and a goat. The term chimera has come to describe any mythical or fictional animal with parts taken from various animals.
Cyclomon - From the Cyclops, members of a primordial race of giants with a single eye in the middle of each of their foreheads.
Devitamamon

  • Pandora's Box. Pandora was the first human woman created by the gods, specifically by Hephaestus and Athena on the instructions of Zeus.

Dianamon

  • Arrow of Artemis - Artemis was the Hellenic goddess of the hunt, wild animals, wilderness, childbirth, virginity and protector of young girls, bringing and relieving disease in women; she often was depicted as a huntress carrying a bow and arrows. She is the Greek equivalent of Diana.

Dukemon

  • Aegis - The shield/buckler/breastplate of Athena and Zeus, famously bearing Medusa's head. It is described as ageless and immortal: a hundred tassels of pure gold hang fluttering from it, tight-woven each of them, and each the worth of a hundred oxen.

Gaiamon/Gaiamon (Appmon) - Gaia was the ancient Greek goddess of the Earth.

  • Ultimate Adamas - From Adamas, Latin word for Adamant. In Greek Mythology, Cronus castrated his father Uranus using an adamant sickle given to him by his mother Gaia.

Grand Dracumon

  • Eye of the Gorgon - The term 'Gorgon' commonly refers to any of three sisters who had hair of living, venomous snakes, and a horrifying visage that turned those who beheld her to stone.

Grace Novamon

  • Meleagros - From Meleager, a hero venerated in his temenos at Calydon in Aetolia. He was already famed as the host of the Calydonian boar hunt in the epic tradition that was reworked by Homer.

Griffomon - From the Griffin, a legendary creature with the body, tail, and back legs of a lion; the head and wings of an eagle; and an eagle's talons as its front feet. As the lion was traditionally considered the king of the beasts and the eagle was the king of the birds, the griffin was thought to be an especially powerful and majestic creature. The griffin was also thought of as king of the creatures. Griffins are known for guarding treasure and priceless possessions.
Hadesmon - Hades was the ancient Greek god of the underworld, and the name was eventually also used to designate the abode of the dead.

  • King of the Underworld - In mythology, is an otherworld where souls go after death, and is the original Greek idea of afterlife.

Harpymon - From the Harpy, winged spirits best known for constantly stealing all food from Phineus. They were agents of punishment who abducted people and tortured them on their way to Tartarus, and were vicious, cruel and violent. They were usually seen as the personifications of the destructive nature of wind.
Hippogriffomon - From the Hippogriff, a legendary creature which resembles a winged horse with the head and upper body of an eagle.
Jet Mervamon

  • Ouroboros Gate - The ouroboros is an ancient symbol depicting a serpent or dragon eating its own tail.

Lykamon - From Lycaon, a king of Arcadia, son of Pelasgus and Meliboea, who in the most popular version of the myth tested Zeus by serving him a dish of his slaughtered and dismembered son in order to see whether Zeus was truly omniscient. In return for these gruesome deeds Zeus transformed Lycaon into the form of a wolf.
Mermaimon - From the Mermaid, a legendary aquatic creature with the head and upper body of a female human and the tail of a fish.
Metal Garurumon

  • Cocytus Breath - Cocytus is a river in the underworld in Greek mythology. Cocytus flows into the river Acheron, across which is the underworld, the mythological abode of the dead. It is sometimes referred to as a frozen lake.

Minotaurmon - From the Minotaur, a creature with the head of a bull on the body of a man. He dwelt at the center of the Cretan Labyrinth, which was an elaborate maze-like construction designed by the architect Daedalus and his son Icarus, on the command of King Minos of Crete. The Minotaur was eventually killed by the Athenian hero Theseus.
Pegasmon - From the Pegasus, a winged divine horse usually depicted as white in colour. He was captured by the Greek hero Bellerophon near the fountain Peirene with the help of Athena and Poseidon. Pegasus allows the hero to ride him to defeat a monster, the Chimera, before realizing many other exploits.
Poseidomon - Poseidon is one of the twelve Olympian deities of the pantheon in Greek mythology. His main domain is the ocean, and he is called the "God of the Sea".
Plutomon - Pluto was the ruler of the underworld in Greek mythology. The earlier name for the god was Hades, which became more common as the name of the underworld as a place. His Roman counterpart is Dis Pater.
Rosemon X-Antibody

  • Aphroditear - From Aphrodite, the Greek goddess of love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus. Myrtle, roses, doves, sparrows and swans were sacred to her.

Sirenmon - From the Siren, dangerous and beautiful creatures portrayed as femmes fatales who lured nearby sailors with their enchanting music and voices to shipwreck on the rocky coast of their island.
Titamon - From the Titan, immortal beings of incredible strength and stamina and were also the first pantheon of Greek gods and goddesses.
Unimon - From the Unicorn, a legendary animal from European folklore that resembles a white horse with a large, pointed, spiraling horn projecting from its forehead, and sometimes a goat's beard and cloven hooves.
Uranosmon - Uranus was the primal Greek god personifying the sky.
War Greymon X-Antibody

  • Poseidon Force - Poseidon is one of the twelve Olympian deities of the pantheon in Greek mythology. His main domain is the ocean, and he is called the "God of the Sea".

Were Garurumon - From werewolf, a mythological or folkloric human with the ability to shapeshift into a wolf.
Wisemon

  • Pandora Dialogue - Pandora was the first human woman created by the gods, specifically by Hephaestus and Athena on the instructions of Zeus.

Witchmon - From the witch, a woman thought to have magic powers, especially evil ones, popularly depicted as wearing a black cloak and pointed hat and flying on a broomstick.

Hindu/Buddhist Mythology

Aldamon - From Alder, which is short for Aldernalisuvara, a name variation of Ardhanārīśvara (अर्धनारीश्वर) particularly used in Japan. Ardhanārīśvara is an aspect of Shiva representing the balance between masculinity and femininity, depicted as an androgynous figure split down the middle.

  • Brahmastra - A mythological bow created by the god of creation, Brahma.
  • Brahmashira - A weapon created by Brahma that had four times more power than the Brahmastra, and thus is never used in war.

Agnimon - From Agni, the Hindu and Vedic god of fire as well as guardian of humanity. Agni is one of the three chief gods in the Rigveda, personifying fire and was at the center of ancient worship. The fire altar was orientated towards the East, the direction of sunrise, the ever new beginning. As the bestower of immortality and the cleanser from sin after death, Agni acted as a mediator between gods and men.
Andiramon/Andiramon (Data) - From Aṇḍīra, one of the Twelve Heavenly Generals, who are the protective deities or yaksha of the Bhaisajyaguru. Aṇḍīra represents the Rabbit.

  • Asipatravana - Asipatravana is one of the Narakas, or hells, in Buddhism. Asipatravana is the hell where the leaves of trees are swords, and where people who wantonly cut down trees are sent.

Asuramon - Named after the Asuras, a different group of power-seeking deities besides the suras, who are sometimes considered naturalists, or nature-beings. They are the forces of chaos that are in constant battle with Devas.
Caturamon - From Catura, one of the Twelve Heavenly Generals, who are the protective deities or yaksha of the Bhaisajyaguru. Catura represents the Dog

  • Śwabhojana - Śwabhojana is one of the Narakas, or hells, in Buddhism. Śwabhojana is the hell where they feed upon dogs, and where religious students who sleep in the day, and are, though unconsciously, defiled; and those who, though mature, are instructed in sacred literature by their children, are sent.

Garudamon - From Garuda, a large mythical bird or bird-like creature that appears in both Hindu and Buddhist mythology. Garuda is depicted as having the golden body of a strong man with a white face, red wings, and an eagle's beak and with a crown on his head.
Hanumon - From Hanuman, a Hindu deity who was an ardent devotee of Rama according to the Hindu legends. A vanara (ape-like humanoid), Hanuman participated in Rama's war against the demon king Ravana.
Indaramon - From Indra/Indara, one of the Twelve Heavenly Generals, who are the protective deities or yaksha of the Bhaisajyaguru. Indara represents the Horse.

  • Adhomukha - Adhomukha is one of the Narakas, or hells, in Buddhism. Adhomukha is the head-inverted hell, where people who take unlawful gifts are sent.

Juggernaut (From Tamers, a program deployed by Hypnos and Digimon World 3, a battleship and part of Destromon's body) - From Juggernaut, a form of the Hindu god Krishna, one of the most widely revered and most popular of all Indian divinities, worshipped as the eighth incarnation of the Hindu god Vishnu and also as the Svayam Bhagavan in his own right.
Kongoumon - From Shūkongoujin, more specificially Mahachakra Vajrapāṇi, a bodhisattva in Buddhism who acted the protector and guide of the Buddha, as well as meaning "vajra".

  • Vajra - A symbolic ritual object that symbolizes both the properties of a diamond (indestructibility) and a thunderbolt (irresistible force). The vajra is used symbolically by the Dharma traditions of Buddhism, Jainism and Hinduism, often to represent firmness of spirit and spiritual power.

Kumbhiramon - From Kumbhīra, one of the Twelve Heavenly Generals, who are the protective deities or yaksha of the Bhaisajyaguru. Kumbhīra represents the Rat.

  • Krimíśa - Krimíśa is one of the Narakas, or hells, in Buddhism. Krimíśa is the hell of insects, where people who practise magic rites for the harm of others are sent.
  • Bao Chu - A Chinese name for the vajra, a symbolic ritual object that symbolizes both the properties of a diamond (indestructibility) and a thunderbolt (irresistible force). The vajra is used symbolically by the Dharma traditions of Buddhism, Jainism and Hinduism, often to represent firmness of spirit and spiritual power. Kumbhīra is often depicted armed with a vajra.

Kuzuhamon

  • Taizoukai Mandala - The Mandala of the Two Realms is a set of two mandalas depicting both the Five Wisdom Buddhas of the Diamond Realm as well as the Five Wisdom Kings of the Womb Realm. 'Taizoukai' refers to the Womb Realm, which depicts the active, physical manifestation of Buddha in the natural world.

Majiramon - From Majira, one of the Twelve Heavenly Generals, who are the protective deities or yaksha of the Bhaisajyaguru. Majira represents the Dragon.

  • Vedhaka - Vedhaka is one of the Narakas, or hells, in Buddhism. Vedhaka is the hell of piercing, where people who make arrows are sent.

Makuramon - From Makura, one of the Twelve Heavenly Generals, who are the protective deities or yaksha of the Bhaisajyaguru. Makura represents the Monkey.

  • Raurava - Raurava is one of the Narakas, or hells, in Buddhism. Raurava is the hell of screaming, where people who bear false witness through partiality, or who utter any falsehoods are sent.

Mihiramon - From Mihira, one of the Twelve Heavenly Generals, who are the protective deities or yaksha of the Bhaisajyaguru. Mihira represents the Tiger.

  • Vimohana - Vimohana is one of the Narakas, or hells, in Buddhism. Vimohana is the hell of bewildering, where thieves and contemners of prescribed observances are sent.

Pajramon - From Pajra, one of the Twelve Heavenly Generals, who are the protective deities or yaksha of the Bhaisajyaguru. Pajra represents the Sheep.

  • Vahnijwála - Vahnijwála is one of the Narakas, or hells, in Buddhism. Vahnijwála is the hell of fiery flame, where sheep tenders and deer hunters are sent.

Sakuyamon

  • Kongoukai Mandala - The Mandala of the Two Realms is a set of two mandalas depicting both the Five Wisdom Buddhas of the Diamond Realm as well as the Five Wisdom Kings of the Womb Realm. 'Kongoukai' refers to the Diamond Realm, which represents the unchanging cosmic principle of the Buddha.

Sandiramon - From Śāṇḍilya, one of the Twelve Heavenly Generals, who are the protective deities or yaksha of the Bhaisajyaguru. Śāṇḍilya represents the Snake.

  • Krishńa - Krishńa is one of the Narakas, or hells, in Buddhism. Krishńa is the hell of darkness, where people who cause impotence, trespass on others' lands, are impure, or who live by fraud are sent.

Sinduramon - From Sindura, one of the Twelve Heavenly Generals, who are the protective deities or yaksha of the Bhaisajyaguru. Sindura represents the Rooster.

  • Púyaváha - Púyaváha is one of the Narakas, or hells, in Buddhism. Púyaváha is the hell where matter flows, and where people who eat by themselves sweetmeats mixed with rice, and Brahmans who vend Lac, flesh, liquors, sesamum, or salt, or who commit violence are sent.

Vajramon - From Vajra, one of the Twelve Heavenly Generals, who are the protective deities or yaksha of the Bhaisajyaguru. Vajra represents the Ox.

  • Rodha - Rodha is one of the Narakas, or hells, in Buddhism. Rodha is the hell of obstruction, where people who cause abortion, plunder towns, kill cows, or strangle men are sent.

Vikaralamon - From Vikarāla, one of the Twelve Heavenly Generals, who are the protective deities or yaksha of the Bhaisajyaguru. Vikarāla represents the Pig/Boar.

  • Súkara - Súkara is one of the Narakas, or hells, in Buddhism. Súkara is the hell of swines, where murderers of Brahmans, stealers of gold, or drinkers of wine are sent.

Vritramon - In the early Vedic religion, Vritra or Vṛtra "The Enveloper", was an Asura and also a serpent or dragon, the personification of drought and enemy of Indra.
Yaksamon - From the Yaksha, the name of a broad class of nature-spirits, usually benevolent, who are caretakers of the natural treasures hidden in the earth and tree roots. In Hindu, Jain, and Buddhist texts, the yakṣa has a dual personality. On the one hand, a yakṣa may be an inoffensive nature-fairy, associated with woods and mountains; but there is also a darker version of the yakṣa, which is a kind of ghost (bhuta) that haunts the wilderness and waylays and devours travelers, similar to the rakṣasas.
Zamielmon

Irish/Celtic Mythology

Bolgmon - The Fir Bolg were one of the races that inhabited the island of Ireland prior to the arrival of the Tuatha Dé Danann. / Bolgios was a Gaulish leader during the Gallic invasion of the Balkans who led an invasion of Macedon and Illyria in 279 BC, killing the Macedonian king Ptolemy Keraunos.
Craniummon

  • Claíomh Solais - Claíomh Solais is an Irish term meaning "Sword of Light", or "Shining Sword", which appears in a number of Irish folk-tales. The folk tales featuring the Claíomh Solais typically compels the hero to perform (three) sets of tasks, aided by helpers, who may be a servant woman, "helpful animal companions", or some other supernatural being.
  • Avalon - Avalon is a legendary island featured in the Arthurian legend. It was the place where King Arthur's sword Excalibur was forged and later where Arthur was taken to recover from his wounds after the Battle of Camlann.

Fairymon - From the Fairy, a type of mythical being or legendary creature in European folklore, generally conceived as having a diminutive human form and possessing magical powers with which it intervenes in human affairs.
Slayerdramon

  • Fragarach - Fragarach, known as 'The Answerer' or 'The Retaliator', was the sword of Manannan mac Lir and later, Lugh Lamfada. It was forged by the gods, and said that no one could tell a lie with Fragarach at his or her throat, thus the name 'Answerer'. It was also said to place the wind at the user's command and could cut through any shield or wall, and had a piercing wound from which no man could recover.

Japanese Mythology

Bakumon - From the Baku, creatures that devour dreams and nightmares. The elephant’s head, trunk, and tusks are common characteristics of baku depicted in folklore, though more modern depictions tend to resemble tapirs more closely. 'Baku' is also the Japanese word for tapir.
Fūjinmon - Fūjin is the Japanese god of the wind and one of the eldest Shinto gods. He is portrayed as a terrifying dark demon, resembling a red headed black humanoid wearing a leopard skin, carrying a large bag of winds on his shoulders.
Gawappamon - From the Kappa, a type of water sprite found in Japanese folklore who are typically depicted as roughly humanoid in form, and about the size of a child. Although their appearance varies from region to region, the most consistent features are a carapace, a beak for a mouth, and the sara, an indentation on the top of their head that holds water which is regarded as the source of their power.
Karatenmon - From the Karasu-tengu, also known as simply Tengu, a type of yōkai found in Japanese folk religion. They are traditionally depicted with both human and avian characteristics.
Kudamon - From the Kuda-gitsune, or 'pipe fox', creatures supposedly employed by Japanese kitsune-tsukai, those who use foxes as spirit familiars.
Kuzuhamon - From Kuzunoha, a white kitsune who according to legend was the mother of Abe no Seimei in Japanese folklore.

  • Ura Izuna - Izuna is a fox-sorcery practice which is part of this cult, which utilizes creatures such as the kuda-gitsune, or 'pipe fox'.

Kyubimon - From the Kyuubi, a reference to kyuubi no Kitsune who is a legendary fox in Japanese mythology.
Kyukimon - The kyūki is a bladed weasel, similar to the kamaitachi.
Messemon

  • Kotodama Rain - Kotodama refers to the Japanese belief that mystical powers dwell in words and names. The notion of kotodama presupposes that sounds can magically affect objects.

Pokomon

  • Sesshouseki - Sesshouseki is the embodiment of an evil nine-tailed fox killed by Miura-no-suke in the legend of Tamamo-no-Mae 「玉藻の前」 in Japanese mythology.

Ravmon

Sakuyamon - From the Konohanasakuya-hime, the blossom-princess and symbol of delicate earthly life in Japanese mythology.

  • Izuna - A fox-sorcery practice which is part of this cult, which utilizes creatures such as the kuda-gitsune, or 'pipe fox'.

Suijinmon - From the Suijin, the Shinto god of water in Japan. The term Suijin refers to the heavenly and earthly manifestations of the benevolent Shinto divinity of water.
Susanoomon - From Susanoo, the Shinto god of the sea and storms. He is also considered to be ruler of Yomi, the land of the dead. He is the brother of Amaterasu, the goddess of the Sun, and of Tsukuyomi, the god of the Moon.

  • Ama-no-Habakiri - Another name for the Totsuka-no-Tsurugi, the legendary sword of the Shinto god Susanoo.
  • Yakusa-no-Ikadzuchi - The Yakusa-no-Ikadzuchi refers to the eight gods of thunder that arose from the dead body of Izanami in Yomi, after she had died giving birth to Kagatsuchi.
  • ZERO-ARMS: Orochi - Named after the Yamata no Orochi, a legendary 8-headed and 8-tailed serpent that was slain by Susanoo.

Qinglongmon

  • Raijin no Mai - Raijin is a god of lightning, thunder and storms in the Shinto religion and in Japanese mythology. He is typically depicted as a demon beating drums to create thunder, usually with the symbol tomoe drawn on the drums.

Raidenmon - Raiden is another name for Raijin, the god of lightning, thunder and storms in the Shinto religion.
Raijinmon - Raijin is a god of lightning, thunder and storms in the Shinto religion and in Japanese mythology. He is typically depicted as a demon beating drums to create thunder, usually with the symbol tomoe drawn on the drums.
Siesamon - From the Shisa, a traditional Ryukyuan decoration, often in pairs, resembling a cross between a lion and a dog, from Okinawan mythology. Shisa are wards, believed to protect from some evils.
Yatagaramon - From the Yatagarasu, a three-legged crow god symbolic specifically of guidance. This great crow was sent from heaven as a guide for Emperor Jimmu on his initial journey from the region which would become Kumano to what would become Yamato.

  • Mikafutsu no Kami - The personification of a divine sword. At the time of Emperor Jinmu's campaign to the east, Amaterasu ordered Takemikazuchi to assist the beleaguered Jinmu, whereupon Takemikazuchi miraculously sent his divine sword Futsu no mitama to appear in the warehouse of Takakuraji in Kumano.

Youkomon - A youko is a spirit fox or fox demon in Japanese mythology.
Zanbamon - From the Zanbatō, an especially large, curved type of fictional Japanese sword. The name zanbatō literally translates to "horse-slaying sword".

Middle Eastern Mythology

Deathmon - From Samael, said to be the "Angel of Death", an important archangel in Talmudic and post-Talmudic lore, a figure who is an accuser (satan), seducer and destroyer, and has been regarded as both good and evil. Samael became the consort of Adam's first wife, Lilith, who is also his uncircumised sexual partner.
Charismon

  • Aleph = Ein - The Aleph is the first letter of Ein-Sof, understood in Kabbalah as God prior to his self-manifestation in the production of any spiritual realm, probably derived from Ibn Gabirol's term, "the Endless One" (she-en lo tiklah).

Lilithmon - Lilith is often identified as a female demon. She is Adam's first wife in Jewish mythology. She left Adam after she refused to become subservient to him and then would not return to the Garden of Eden after she mated with archangel Samael.

  • Nazar Nail - A nazar is an eye-shaped amulet believed to protect against the evil eye, most commonly found around the Middle East.

Mastemon - Mastema is an angel who persecutes evil in Jewish mythology. In the Zadokite Fragments and the Dead Sea Scrolls, he is the angel of disaster, the father of all evil, and a flatterer of God.
Raguelmon - From Raguel, an archangel mainly of the Judaic traditions, also known as the "Angel of Justice". His name's meaning is considered to be "Friend of God" or "God's wish" .
Rasielmon - From Raziel, an archangel within the teachings of Jewish mysticism (of the Kabbalah of Judaism) who is the "Keeper of Secrets" and the "Angel of Mysteries".

  • Sefer Raziel - The Sefer Raziel HaMalakh or "Book o the Angel Raziel" is a medieval Practical Kabbalah grimoire, primarily written in Hebrew and Aramaic.

Rhinomon

  • Ain Soph Aur - Ain Soph Aur literally translates to 'Endless Light'. It is the source of the ten sephiroth on the Kabbalistic Tree of Life, and is a term used in the Kabbalah as the base of Creation, from Ain (Nothingness), to Ain-Soph (Limitlessness), to Ain-Soph Aur (Endless Light).

Rosemon/Rosemon: Burst Mode/Babamon

  • Tiferet - Tiferet is the sixth Sefirot in the Tree of Life in the Kabbalah of Judaism. It has the common association of "Spirituality", "Balance", "Integration", "Beauty", "Miracles", and "Compassion".

Sephirothmon - From the Sephiroth, the 10 attributes/emanations in Kabbalah, through which "Ein Sof" (The Infinite) reveals Himself and continuously creates both the physical realm and the chain of higher metaphysical realms (Seder hishtalshelus).
Shutumon - Shutu is the Sumerian god of the south wind in the Gulf, who is also a god of illness and sicknesses.

  • Gilgamesh Slicer - Gilgamesh was the fifth king of Uruk and the central character in the Epic of Gilgamesh. In Mesopotamian mythology, Gilgamesh is a demigod of superhuman strength who built the city walls of Uruk to defend his people from external threats, and travelled to meet the sage Utnapishtim, who had survived the Great Deluge. He is usually described as two-thirds god and one third man.

Vamdemon - From the vampire, a preternatural undead being in human form that survives by sucking the blood of living people at night.
Wizarmon - From the wizard, a man who professes or is supposed to practice magic or sorcery to harm or help other people.

Norse/Germanic Mythology

Blitzmon

  • Thor Hammer - Thor is a hammer-wielding god associated with thunder, lightning, storms, oak trees, strength, the protection of mankind, and also hallowing, healing and fertility.
  • Mjölnir Thunder - Mjölnir is the hammer of Thor, the Norse god of thunder. Mjölnir is depicted in Norse mythology as one of the most fearsome weapons, capable of leveling mountains.

Chaos Dukemon

  • Balmung - Balmung is a legendary sword used by Sigurd/Siegfried to slay the dragon Fafnir, and was passed down to him by his father Sigmund, who received it in the hall of the Völsung after pulling it out of the tree Barnstokkr into which Odin had stuck it where no one else could pull it out. In some depictions it is the alternate name for Gram, while in the Nibelungenlied, Siegfried discards Gram after receiving a legendary sword called Balmung.

DigiElf - The Elves were creatures of Norse mythology with magical powers, given to capricious and often mischievous interference in human affairs, and originally imagined as a race of minor nature and fertility gods, who are often pictured as youthful-seeming men and women of great beauty, living in forests and underground places, like caves, or in wells and springs.
DigiGnome - The Gnomes were an offshoot of dwarves originally featured in Renaissance mythology, who are depicted as shriveled little old humanoids, that inhabit the interior of the earth and act as guardians of its treasures.
Dukemon

  • Gram - Gram is a legendary sword used by Sigurd/Siegfried to slay the dragon Fafnir, and was passed down to him by his father Sigmund, who received it in the hall of the Völsung after pulling it out of the tree Barnstokkr into which Odin had stuck it where no one else could pull it out.

Dukemon: Crimson Mode

  • Gungnir - Gungnir is the spear of the god Odin. The spear is described as being so well balanced that it could strike any target, no matter the skill or strength of the wielder.

Garummon - From Garmr/Garm, a dog associated with Ragnarök and described as a blood-stained watchdog that guards Hel's gate.
Löwemon

  • Nibelungen Ring - From Nibelung; Nibelungen/Niflungr is the name in Germanic and Norse mythology of the royal family or lineage of the Burgundians who settled in the early 5th century at Worms, Germany. Der Ring des Nibelungen is a cycle of four epic operas based on Norse mythology and Nibelungenlied, which tells the story of the dragon-slayer Siegfried at the court of the Burgundians, how he was murdered, and of his wife Kriemhild's revenge.

Mikihara Norn - Both her forename and surname have close references to Yggdrasil; Mikihara roughly meaning "world tree of beauty" or "beautiful world tree", referring to Yggdrasil, and Norns being mythological female beings living under the roots of Yggdrasil in Norse Mythology.
New Digital World

  • Ulud Terminal (Past) - From Urðr/Urd, one of the three Norns who tended to the world tree, Yggdrasil in Norse mythology. Urðr is Old Norse for 'fate', and represents the past.
  • Versandi Terminal (Present) - From Verðandi/Verthandi, one of the three Norns who tended to the world tree, Yggdrasil in Norse mythology. Verðandi is Old Norse for 'happening' or 'present', and represents the present.
  • Skuld Terminal (Future) - From Skuld, one of the three Norns who tended to the world tree, Yggdrasil in Norse mythology. Skuld is Old Norse for 'debt' or 'future', and represents the future.

Olegmon

  • Jörmungandr - Also known as the Midgard Serpent or World Serpent, he is a sea serpent, the middle child of the giantess Angrboða and the god Loki. The serpent grew so large that he was able to surround the earth and grasp his own tail; when he lets go, the world will end. Jörmungandr's arch-enemy is the god Thor.
  • Surtr - An elder jötunn who is the ruler of the sons of Múspell and releases flames that engulf the world during the Ragnarök while going to battle against the Æsir, where he does battle with the major god Freyr.
  • Age of Discovery - The opponent is taken to Jötunheimr: one of the Nine Worlds and the homeland of the Giants of Norse Mythology.

Omegamon Zwart D/Alter-B

  • Black Berserker - The Berserkers were champion Norse fierce warriors who were known for battling in an uncontrollable, trance-like fury, and were alleged to be able to perform seemingly impossible super-human feats of strength. In medieval Norse and Germanic history and folklore, the berserkers were described as members of an unruly warrior gang that worshipped Odin, the supreme Norse deity.

Parrotmon

  • Mjölnir Thunder - Mjölnir is the hammer of Thor, the Norse god of thunder. Mjölnir is depicted in Norse mythology as one of the most fearsome weapons, capable of leveling mountains.

Ragnamon - From Ragnarök, a series of future events, including a great battle foretold to ultimately result in the death of a number of major figures (including the gods Odin, Thor, Týr, Freyr, Heimdallr, and Loki), the occurrence of various natural disasters, and the subsequent submersion of the world in water in Norse Mythology.
Sleipmon - From Sleipnir, Odin's eight-legged steed that is described as the best of all horses.

  • Muspelheim - A realm of fire which is one of the Nine Worlds and it is home to the fire jötunn or the "sons of Muspell", and Surtr, their ruler.
  • Niflheim - One of the Nine Worlds and is a location which overlaps with the notions of Niflhel and Hel. Niflheim was primarily a realm of primordial ice and cold, with nine frozen rivers. Creation began when its waters mixed with the heat of Muspelheim to create a "creating steam".
  • Bifröst - Bifröst is a burning rainbow bridge that reaches between Midgard (the world) and Asgard, the realm of the gods.
  • Odin's Breath - Odin is a major god in Norse mythology and the ruler of Asgard. Odin is a principal member of the Æsir (the major group of the Norse pantheon) and is associated with war, battle, victory and death, but also wisdom, Shamanism, magic, poetry, prophecy, and the hunt.

Valkyrimon - From the Valkyrie, female figures who decide which soldiers die in battle and which live. Selecting among half of those who die in battle, the valkyries bring their chosen to the afterlife hall of the slain, Valhalla, ruled over by the god Odin.

  • Freyr - Freyr was the god associated with sacral kingship, virility and prosperity, with sunshine and fair weather, and was pictured as a phallic fertility god, Freyr "bestows peace and pleasure on mortals".
  • Fenrir Sword - Fenrir is a monstrous wolf who was foretold to kill the god Odin during the events of Ragnarök, but will in turn be killed by Odin's son Víðarr.
  • Aurvandil's Arrow - Aurvandil is mentioned once in Norse Mythology, its name being linked to a star.

Velgmon - From Hræsvelgr, a giant who takes eagle form. He sits at the end of the world (or the northern edge of the heavens) and causes the wind to blow when he beats his wings in flight.
Vikemon

  • Mjölnir - Mjölnir is the hammer of Thor, the Norse god of thunder. Mjölnir is depicted in Norse mythology as one of the most fearsome weapons, capable of leveling mountains.

Yggdrasill - From the Yggdrasil, a giant ash tree that connected the nine worlds in Norse mythology.
YMIR Project (From Digimon World Dawn/Dusk, a cancelled project which eventually led to the creation of Chronomon) - From Ymir, a primeval being who was born from venom that dripped from the icy rivers Élivágar and lived in the grassless void of Ginnungagap. He was the ancestor of all jötnar. The gods Odin, Vili, and Vé fashioned the Earth from his flesh, from his blood the ocean, from his bones the hills, from his hair the trees, from his brains the clouds, from his skull the heavens, and from his eyebrows the middle realm in which mankind lives, Midgard.
ZERO ARMS: Grani - Grani is a horse owned by the hero Sigurd/Siegfried, received through the advice of Odin. Grani is a descendant of Odin's own steed, Sleipnir.

Roman Mythology

Apollomon - Apollo was the god the of the sun and also the twin brother of Diana/Artemis in Roman and Greek mythology.

  • Phoebus Blow - 'Phoebus' was one of the ephitets applied to Apollo, which literally meant 'radiant'.

Bacchusmon - Bacchus was the god of the grape harvest, wine-making and ecstasy. His Greek counterpart is Dionysus.
Beautymon

  • Venus Rod - Venus is the Roman goddess whose functions encompassed love, beauty, sex, fertility, prosperity and victory. In Roman mythology, she was the mother of the Roman people through her son, Aeneas, who survived the fall of Troy and fled to Italy.

Ceresmon - Ceres was a goddess of agriculture, grain crops, fertility and motherly relationships.
Cupimon - Cupid is the Roman god of desire, erotic love, attraction and affection. He is often portrayed as the son of the love goddess, Venus. His Greek counterpart is Eros.
Dianamon - Diana was the goddess of the hunt, the moon and birthing, being associated with wild animals and woodland, and having the power to talk to and control animals. She is the Roman equivalent of Artemis, the twin sister of Apollo in Greek Mythology. Diana was known to be the virgin goddess of childbirth and women.
Jupitermon - Jupiter was the Roman king of the gods and the god of sky and thunder. He is the Roman counterpart of the Greek god Zeus.
Junomon - Juno is an ancient Roman goddess, the protector and special counselor of the state, goddess of marriage and childbirth. She is a daughter of Saturn and sister (but also the wife) of the chief god Jupiter and the mother of Mars and Vulcan.
Mercurymon - Mercury is a major Roman god, being one of the Dii Consentes within the ancient Roman pantheon. He was the patron god of financial gain, commerce, eloquence (and thus poetry), messages/communication (including divination), travelers, boundaries, luck, trickery and thieves; he was also the guide of souls to the underworld. His Greek counterpart is Hermes.

  • Kerykeion - A short staff entwined by two serpents, sometimes surmounted by wings. In Roman iconography it was often depicted being carried in the left hand of Mercury, the messenger of the gods.

Marsmon - Mars was the Roman god of war and also an agricultural guardian, a combination characteristic of early Rome. Mars represented military power as a way to secure peace, and was a father of the Roman people. His Greek counterpart is Ares.
Mervamon - Menrva/Merva was an Etruscan goddess of war, art, wisdom and health. She contributed much of her character to the Roman Minerva.
Minervamon - Minerva was the Roman goddess of wisdom and sponsor of arts, trade, defence and who was born from the godhead of Jupiter with weapons. She was the virgin goddess of music, poetry, medicine, wisdom, commerce, weaving, crafts, magic. Her Greek counterpart is Athena.
Minerva - Minerva was the Roman goddess of wisdom and sponsor of arts, trade, defence and who was born from the godhead of Jupiter with weapons. She was the virgin goddess of music, poetry, medicine, wisdom, commerce, weaving, crafts, magic. Her Greek counterpart is Athena.
Neptunemon - Neptune was the Roman god of freshwater and the sea in Roman religion. He is the Roman counterpart of the Greek god Poseidon.
Venusmon - Venus is the Roman goddess whose functions encompassed love, beauty, sex, fertility, prosperity and victory. In Roman mythology, she was the mother of the Roman people through her son, Aeneas, who survived the fall of Troy and fled to Italy.
Vulcanusmon - From Vulcan, the god of fire, including the fire of volcanoes. Vulcan is often depicted with a blacksmith's hammer. His Greek counterpart is Hephaestus, the god of fire and smithery.